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Learn How To Use Your Digital Camera

The Beauty of a Scan

Dogwood Sprig #1

 

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JGrant_Dogwood_3.jpg

© Jarvis Grant

These macro photos are of Dogwood Blossoms. Instead of a camera to make these images I used a flatbed scanner. The scans were made at 100% magnification of 1 inch by, 8 inch at 4800 ppi. They were processed in Photoshop with minimal tonal enhancement, some Dodging & Burning using Soft Light. For this technique, a new layer is placed at the top of the layer stack. This layer is set to Soft Light Blending mode. Then using a soft edge paint brush, set to 22% opacity in the Option Bar, paint with Black to make local areas darker and paint with White to make local areas lighter.


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